Posted on August 10, 2015
The Department of Traffic says it might soon begin imposing QR500 fine on motorists who do not maintain lane discipline and overtake from the right. Experts are working to develop software programs whereby cameras fitted on roundabouts and interchanges would be able to check violations related to lane cutting and overtaking. In the next 45 days, the number of devices to detect wrong overtaking would be increased.
 
This was disclosed by Brigadier Mohamed Saad Al Kharji, Director of the department, in remarks to local Arabic daily Al Watan published yesterday. He said motorists must also maintain sufficient space between cars (space between a car and the one in the front) since narrow space can lead to accident. There are rules and regulations and traffic police patrols could impose fines (QR500) on violators. Brigadier Al Kharji said as for trucks and trailers violating city entry rules, 50 patrols have been exclusively deputed to monitor them. At least 40 of the teams are assigned for Doha, he said. 

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Like cars breaking speed limits, those driving too slow and in ways that obstruct traffic could also be punished. Talking of the use of mobile phone by motorists while driving, Brigadier Al Kharji said it is one of the major causes of accidents worldwide. According to him, there was a proposal from local authorities that mobile phones used by motorists while driving could be jammed through electronic devices. “But the proposal was found to be impractical because there are people who can be contacted on mobile phones in emergency and they include doctors who save lives,” Brigadier Al Kharji said.
 
Traffic patrols can now use cameras fitted on roadside, near traffic lights and roundabouts and zoom in on motorists using mobile phones, he said. He said a pilot project to assess the feasibility of introducing traffic and road safety awareness programmes as part of school curriculum has been successful. From the next academic year that starts next month, all schools will be taught traffic and road safety as part of curriculum. The schools also include non-Arabic ones.
 
source: The Peninsula

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